DELLA MAE with Rachel Baiman – Tickets – Brooklyn Arts Center – Wilmington, NC – March 15th, 2020

DELLA MAE with Rachel Baiman
presented by MaxxMusic & One More Go Productions

DELLA MAE

Rachel Baiman

Brooklyn Arts Center
$18.00 - $23.00
All Ages
DELLA MAE live at Brooklyn Arts Center in Wilmington with opening guest Rachel Baiman!

Tickets: $18 adv/$20.50 dos ($22 at the show) - Standing Room Only

DELLA MAE

Since forming in Boston in 2009, Nashville-based string band Della Mae has established a reputation as a charismatic live act comprised of some of the finest players in bluegrass, Americana and beyond.

Originating from different musical backgrounds and states across the US and Canada, each member brings distinct elements that make Della Mae such a beloved band. Together they have a completely original style – sensitive yet assertive, intense yet playful, steeped in tradition yet undeniably current. Versatile instrumentalists and vocalists, they draw from a bottomless well of roots influences to create vibrant original music that conveys expansive musical vision. With timeless lyrical truth-telling and an unmistakably contemporary sensibility, they stand alongside such roots-conscious acts as the Avett Brothers, Punch Brothers, the Lumineers, and Hurray for the Riff Raff.

They were IBMA’s Emerging Artists of the Year in 2013, GRAMMY Nominees in 2014 for their debut album on Rounder Records, named among Rolling Stone’s “10 bands to watch for in 2015,” and have since traveled with the US State Department to over 18 countries spreading peace and understanding through music.

Through powerful experiences traveling the world together, the group discovered that Della Mae is more than a recording and touring band. Their mission to make a difference in the world emerged, and it became clearer that reflection was required to determine Della Mae’s next move.

In May 2016, after six years of extensive touring (averaging 220 days on the road per year, travel to over 30 countries and almost all US states), Della Mae took a break from the road. Each member took time to regroup, to pursue individual passions and projects, to regain footing, and to reflect on what they had just done – individually and together. This reflection revealed what Della Mae has come to mean to thousands of fans, to young girls worldwide, and to themselves.

Now, Della Mae is embarking on a new chapter together.

In 2018, to further their mission of showcasing top female musicians, select appearances feature special guests including GRAMMY award winning banjo player Alison Brown, Bonnie Paine of Elephant Revival, original Della Mae guitarist Avril Smith, and more.

Armed with a passel of dynamic new tunes and a renewed sense of purpose, Della Mae is eager to get back on the road and introduce their new music to their loyal admirers.

Della Mae’s first full-length album since their 2015 self-titled effort, Headlight matches its raw intensity with an unbridled joy. In the making of Headlight, releasing January 17th, Della Mae has claimed a more daring sense of freedom than they’d ever allowed themselves before. Boldly breaking genre convention, the Grammy Award-nominated band fully embraced the album’s potential as a platform for change, delivering a collection of songs at turns fearlessly personal and powerfully resonant.

Even Rolling Stone lists Della Mae's single track, "Headlight" as a must-hear song -- “Be a headlight in this dark night,” Della Mae frontwoman Celia Woodsmith sings, standing in solidarity with all the strong, courageous women around her...“Headlight” is fueled by equal parts resilience and rage."

Della Mae is:

Celia Woodsmith—vocals, guitar Kimber Ludiker—fiddle, vocals Jenni Lyn Gardner—mandolin, vocals Courtney Hartman—guitar, banjo, vocals Zoe Guigueno-- bass, vocals

RACHEL BAIMAN

Rachel Baiman’s June 2017 label debut Shame was featured on NPR’s “Songs We Love”, called a “Rootsy Wake-up Call” by Folk Alley, and described by Vice’s “Noisey” as “flipping off authority one song at a time.” Now Baiman has announced Thanksgiving (out November 2 on Free Dirt Records), a self-produced four-song EP, featuring her live trio as well as special guests including Molly Tuttle and Josh Oliver

Thanksgiving is a collection of music to inspire an introspective holiday spirit. The songs center around themes of Indigenous Rights, home and homelessness, and love in hard times. “Thanksgiving has always been one of my favorite holidays,” says Baiman. “But two years ago in November, the fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline was in full swing, and it just got me thinking about how the relationship between indigenous and white people in this country has hardly changed at all over the years. The irony of Thanksgiving being celebrated right as people were being arrested and sprayed with water guns for protecting their right to clean water really hit me”.

The EP opens with the jovial sounding “Tent City” which features a hard-driving bluegrass band. However, the slaphappy sound becomes erie as the lyrics sink in , The song is from the perspective of a man who has fallen from his picturesque middle class lifestyle into homelessness and addiction. Yet the matter-of-fact delivery huamizes his story and gives context to a character who might otherwise be treated as a statistic.

The collection is not all doom and gloom, however, as the first two darker tracks are followed by the cheerful John Hartford number “Madison Tennessee. “I’m getting married this year,” says Baiman, “My fiance and I recently moved out to Madison and have been fixing up a little cabin on the river. I spend so much time traveling, it’s an amazing feeling to finally put down some roots and work on creating a magical and inspiring space. This Hartford tune makes me feel giddy about home and for me thats what Thanksgiving is all about.” “Madison Tennessee” features bluegrass guitar virtuoso and Americana Music Association “Instrumentalist of the Year” Molly Tuttle, who toured in a duo with Baiman in 2018.

“Times Like These, the EP’s final track, features guitar player and singer Josh Oliver, another of Baiman’s frequent musical collaborators. Ending on an uplifting note, the song is a testament to the good that gets us through the bad. “Open the window / And let in the breeze / Darling I need you / Living in times like these,” sing Baiman and Oliver in emotive harmony. Oliver’s beautifully tragic voice hits the listener like teardrops on a page.

Baiman’s Thanksgiving is an intriguing follow up to Shame, allowing her a chance to stretch out stylistically, moving effortlessly between bluegrass, to bolk, old-time and country. The bittersweet lyricism she’s become known for conveys the push and pull of hardship and hope we often feel during the holiday season.

Raised in Chicago by a radical economist and a social worker, Baiman was surrounded by social justice issues her entire life. “If I wanted to rebel against my parents I could have become a finance banker or a corporate lawyer” she says of her childhood. While her classmates went to church or temple on Sunday mornings, Baiman attended the Ethical Humanist Society of Greater Chicago, a non-religious community formed around discussions of morality and current events. “That was always a tough one to explain at school” she says with a laugh.

As a teenager, Baiman found music to be a welcome escape from worrying about global politics. “I often found the constant discussion of seemingly unsolvable problems to be intense and overwhelming, and when I moved to Nashville to pursue music it felt like something positive, beautiful and productive that I could put into the world. Now that I’ve had some years to devote to music,”—Baiman has been recording and touring internationally for the past 4 years with 10 String Symphony, and has played fiddle for numerous other artists including Kacey Musgraves and Winnipeg folk band Oh My Darling—“I find it hard to escape from the values that I grew up with, and I feel compelled to write politically, to speak out about things that I’ve experienced or seen. Songwriting is a unique opportunity to do that, because it avails a more emotional vehicle for discussion. I love the political tradition of folk music, from Woody Guthrie to Tupac, and my hope is that this record adds another voice to it.”

Venue Information:
Brooklyn Arts Center
516 N. 4th St
Wilmington, NC, 28401

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